Category: exams

1. Be honest with yourself and admit that you’re putting off stuff that really needs to be done.

2. Try and figure out why you’re procrastinating. Is it because you don’t like it, it creates anxiety, you don’t understand it, it feels overwhelming, you’re disorganised …?

3. Decide to break the habit of procrastination by deliberately rewarding yourself for doing something you’d rather not do.

4. Make a pact with a friend –where you deliberately and regularly encourage each other, and hold each other accountable.

5. Sit down and think – in detail – about all the likely consequences of not doing what needs to be done. Be brutally honest, and try and picture what you’re life is going to look like 6 months, a year and five years from now ( if you continue to procrastinate).

6. Decide to break large tasks down into smaller, more achievable tasks, and then tackle these smaller tasks one at a time.

7. Recognise your progress, and affirm and praise yourself for making these changes – and doing things differently, even though it’s hard.

Successful people are not gifted. They just work hard, then succeed on purpose.

1.Sort out your priorities. Make time to honestly reflect on your life, and to think about what is important to you. Where are you going? What do you want? What are the steps that will take you there?

2. Focus on the essential tasks. Next, think about your short term responsibilities. Ask yourself: “Out of all the tasks that I have to do, which will get me the greatest return for my time and effort?” Make a list of these types of tasks — they’re your most important things to do this week.

3. Eliminate what you can. Now look at your list. What on the list is not essential? Is there anything there that you can drop from your schedule, delegate to someone else, or put on a “waiting list”. Often when we review these non-essentials later, we find they weren’t necessary at all.

4. Do essential tasks first. Begin each day by doing the two most important tasks. Don’t wait until later in the day as they’ll get pushed aside to make time for other stuff that arises throughout the day. You’ll find that if you do these tasks right away, your productivity will really increase.

5. Eliminate distractions. If you allow yourself to be constantly interrupted by email notifications, IM, cell phones, social media and so on, then you’ll never be productive. Turn them and, if you can, disconnect yourself from the internet.

6. Keep it simple. Don’t waste time on applications that are meant to organise your schedule. Make a simple to-do list with a word document, or with some paper and a pen. Then get started on whatever work you had planned on doing.

7. Do one thing at a time. In most situations, multi-tasking slows you down. You can’t get things done with a million things demanding your attention. Focus on what’s in front of you, to the exclusion of all else. That way, you are likely to achieve more, in less time, and with less effort.

1. Forgive yourself. You aren’t perfect. No one is. Recognise that beating yourself up will only make things worse. Instead, forgive yourself, and then decide to just move on.

2. Focus on motivation. Without motivation, you can’t do anything. It’s much more powerful than self-discipline. So when things get tough, remind yourself of why life will be better if you reach your goal.

3. Make it easy. Discipline is tough so remove some obstacles. For example, if you’re having a hard time exercising, make it super easy by just doing 5 minutes to start with. If you can make that change for 30 days in a row, you’ll have developed a new habit.

4. Focus on enjoyment. It’s hard to push yourself — and to have self-discipline — when you hate doing something, or you see it as a drag. So do whatever you can to create a sense of fun. For example, if you don’t like exercise, find some good music, or a workout partner, and focus on that part of the activity.

5. Repeat. You’ll almost inevitably slip up from time to time, no matter how good, and committed, you are. Just get up, get going, and keeping marching straight ahead.

Source: http://zenhabits.net/6-small-things-you-can-do-when-you-lack-discipline/ (Adapted)

1. Start early. Don’t leave studying to the last minute as cramming doesn’t really work. Preparing well in advance leaves you with time to ask questions and review topics you don’t fully understand.

2. Plan and organise your study time. Decide what you will do, in what order, and by what date.

3. Have an area that you designate specifically for studying. Don’t do anything else there. Keep all your notes, textbooks, materials etc in that area.

4. Study something each day – but allow yourself one whole day off a week. That way, you stay on top of your work without feeling bogged down and overwhelmed.

5. Make your own notes; rewrite material you’ve studied using your own words. Doing that, will help to consolidate your learning.

6. Cover up material you’re studying and try to summarise it, or to paraphrase it.

7. Don’t review material you know already. Assign your time to work that you still find challenging.

1. Make the most of those little slots of time – a free fifteen minutes here and there. You can accomplish a lot in those extra lost minutes.

2. Make your work place comfortable and inviting. For example, have an inspiring bookshelf, light a scented candle, put up a few crazy, fun photographs.

3. Make every effort to enjoy the journey – and remind yourself of the arrival fallacy (arriving at your goal is usually a letdown, and doesn’t bring the joy we thought it would bring.)

4. Don’t be afraid of criticism as it can help you to learn and grow. Dreading it too much creates anxiety which them prevents you from producing your best.

5. Recognise that we rarely feel happy when we’re working as we’re bound to struggle with incompetence, failure, frustration and feeling that we don’t know what to do. However, they are only a part of the total picture, and completing a project leads to pride and confidence.

1. If you’re procrastinating because you’re feeling stuck (eg, if you don’t really understand a school assignment, or you don’t know what’s expected, or you don’t know where to start) then pluck up the courage to ask for some help. When you know what you’re doing, it’s easier to work.

2. Remind yourself that most decisions aren’t major. If you get it wrong, you can start over again … or change your direction … or have another try.

3. If the task seems overwhelming, just take a baby step. That, at least, will get you moving – so the next step’s easier.

4. Tell yourself that you can suffer for up to twenty minutes – and then you’ll return to doing things you want to do. You’ll be surprised to discover that “suffering’s” not that bad.

5. Decide to do the task as soon as you get up – as the more you put it off, the worse it’s going to seem!

6. Don’t pretend that other work counts just as much as what you’re leaving. Simply acting like you’re busy won’t make it go away. Be honest with yourself … and do what’s most important first.

1. Make a genuine commitment to being a disciplined person.

2. Be honest about your weaknesses, distractions, and any habits that might knock you off your course.

3. Make a realistic plan. Write it down, or share it with a friend who will help you to be accountable.

4. Design your day to avoid temptations that will undermine your self discipline.

5. If necessary, change your routine.

6. Reward yourself for small steps in the right direction.

7. Although you are aiming to make change a habit, accept that there will be times when you fail – and if you do, just move on and then start again.

The best way to get things done is simply to begin.

1. Plan your day in advance. That means you can get up and get started right away instead of frittering or wasting time. (Often writing a “to do list” is a useful idea.)

2. Decide on your priorities, and do the most important things first.

3. Also, do the hardest task first. Otherwise, they will niggle at you constantly and slowly drain away your energy.

4. Avoid multi-tasking when you’re working on something important.

5. However, it’s good to multitask when we’re doing menial, repetitive and boring tasks.

6. Ditch requests and tasks that are unimportant, and a total waste of your time!

7. Commit to NOT procrastinating. Ask a friend to keep you accountable.

8. Be organised. This includes engaging in advanced planning; knowing what you need for the task; having everything you need close at hand; bundling similar tasks together; and working in a relatively tidy and clutter-free environment.

9. Cut out distractions and avoid time wasters (social media, cell phones, highly social or demanding people etc)

10. Know what your most productive time of day is and treat that as a sacrosanct period for working.

11. Get into the habit of shutting off racing, distracting and negative thoughts. This is a crucial form of self-discipline.

12. Break large tasks down into smaller sub-tasks – and set achievable deadlines for these.