Category: procrastination

1.Sort out your priorities. Make time to honestly reflect on your life, and to think about what is important to you. Where are you going? What do you want? What are the steps that will take you there?

2. Focus on the essential tasks. Next, think about your short term responsibilities. Ask yourself: “Out of all the tasks that I have to do, which will get me the greatest return for my time and effort?” Make a list of these types of tasks — they’re your most important things to do this week.

. Eliminate what you can. Now look at your list. What on the list is not essential? Is there anything there that you can drop from your schedule, delegate to someone else, or put on a “waiting list”. Often when we review these non-essentials later, we find they weren’t necessary at all.

4. Do essential tasks first. Begin each day by doing the two most important tasks. Don’t wait until later in the day as they’ll get pushed aside to make time for other stuff that arises throughout the day. You’ll find that if you do these tasks right away, your productivity will really increase.

5. Eliminate distractions. If you allow yourself to be constantly interrupted by email notifications, IM, cell phones, social media and so on, then you’ll never be productive. Turn them and, if you can, disconnect yourself from the internet.

6. Keep it simple. Don’t waste time on applications that are meant to organise your schedule. Make a simple to-do list with a word document, or with some paper and a pen. Then get started on whatever work you had planned on doing.

7. Do one thing at a time. In most situations, multi-tasking slows you down. You can’t get things done with a million things demanding your attention. Focus on what’s in front of you, to the exclusion of all else. That way, you are likely to achieve more, in less time, and with less effort.

1. If you’re procrastinating because you’re feeling stuck (eg, if you don’t really understand a school assignment, or you don’t know what’s expected, or you don’t know where to start) then pluck up the courage to ask for some help. When you know what you’re doing, it’s easier to work.

2. Remind yourself that most decisions aren’t major. If you get it wrong, you can start over again, or change your direction, or have another try.

3. If the task seems overwhelming, just take a baby step. That will get you moving – so the next step’s easier.

4. Tell yourself that you can suffer for up to twenty minutes – and then you’ll return to doing things you want to do. You’ll be surprised to discover that “suffering’s” not that bad.

5. Decide to do the task as soon as you get up as the more you put it off, the worse it’s going to feel.

6. Don’t pretend that other work counts just as much as what you’re leaving. Just acting like you’re busy won’t make it go away. Be honest with yourself … and do what’s most important first.

The best way to get things done is simply to begin.

1. Be honest with yourself and admit that you’re putting off stuff that really needs to be done.

2. Try and figure out why you’re procrastinating. Is it because you don’t like it, it creates anxiety, you don’t understand it, it feels overwhelming, you’re disorganised …?

3. Decide to break the habit of procrastination by deliberately rewarding yourself for doing something you’d rather not do.

4. Make a pact with a friend –where you deliberately and regularly encourage each other, and hold each other accountable.

5. Sit down and think – in detail – about all the likely consequences of not doing what needs to be done. Be brutally honest, and try and picture what you’re life is going to look like 6 months, a year and five years from now ( if you continue to procrastinate).

6. Decide to break large tasks down into smaller, more achievable tasks, and then tackle these smaller tasks one at a time.

7. Recognise your progress, and affirm and praise yourself for making these changes – and doing things differently, even though it’s hard.

1. If you’re procrastinating because you’re feeling stuck (eg, if you don’t really understand a school assignment, or you don’t know what’s expected, or you don’t know where to start) then pluck up the courage to ask for some help. When you know what you’re doing, it’s easier to work.

2. Remind yourself that most decisions aren’t major. If you get it wrong, you can start over again … or change your direction … or have another try.

3. If the task seems overwhelming, just take a baby step. That, at least, will get you moving – so the next step’s easier.

4. Tell yourself that you can suffer for up to twenty minutes – and then you’ll return to doing things you want to do. You’ll be surprised to discover that “suffering’s” not that bad.

5. Decide to do the task as soon as you get up – as the more you put it off, the worse it’s going to seem!

6. Don’t pretend that other work counts just as much as what you’re leaving. Simply acting like you’re busy won’t make it go away. Be honest with yourself … and do what’s most important first.

1. Have a realistic plan for your day. Don’t just work on impulse, and don’t do try to do more than you can handle.

2. Prioritize your work, and do the most important things first

3. Know what your distractions are, and take steps to control them (for example, switch off your phone)

4. Start early, and keep on going, even when you feel discouraged or fed up

5. Know what’s irrelevant, and don’t waste your time on unproductive, or pointless things

6. Switch between focused work and lots of short breaks

7. Be flexible if you meet with obstacles, or things don’t turn out the way you’d planned.

1. Be honest with yourself and admit that you’re putting off stuff that really needs to be done.

2. Try and figure out why you’re procrastinating. Is it because you don’t like it, it creates anxiety, you don’t understand it, it feels overwhelming, you’re disorganised …?

3. Decide to break the habit of procrastination by deliberately rewarding yourself for doing something you’d rather not do.

4. Make a pact with a friend –where you deliberately and regularly encourage each other, and hold each other accountable.

5. Sit down and think – in detail – about all the likely consequences of not doing what needs to be done. Be brutally honest, and try and picture what you’re life is going to look like 6 months, a year and five years from now ( if you continue to procrastinate).

6. Decide to break large tasks down into smaller, more achievable tasks, and then tackle these smaller tasks one at a time.

7. Recognise your progress, and affirm and praise yourself for making these changes – and doing things differently, even though it’s hard.

1. Be honest with yourself and admit that you’re putting off stuff that really needs to be done.

2. Try and figure out why you’re procrastinating. Is it because you don’t like it, it creates anxiety, you don’t understand it, it feels overwhelming, you’re disorganised …?

3. Decide to break the habit of procrastination by deliberately rewarding yourself for doing something you’d rather not do.

4. Make a pact with a friend –where you deliberately and regularly encourage each other, and hold each other accountable.

5. Sit down and think – in detail – about all the likely consequences of not doing what needs to be done. Be brutally honest, and try and picture what you’re life is going to look like 6 months, a year and five years from now ( if you continue to procrastinate).

6. Decide to break large tasks down into smaller, more achievable tasks, and then tackle these smaller tasks one at a time.

7. Recognise your progress, and affirm and praise yourself for making these changes – and doing things differently, even though it’s hard.

1. If you’re procrastinating because you’re feeling stuck (eg, if you don’t really understand a school assignment, or you don’t know what’s expected, or you don’t know where to start) then pluck up the courage to ask for some help. When you know what you’re doing, it’s easier to work.

. Remind yourself that most decisions aren’t major. If you get it wrong, you can start over again … or change your direction … or have another try.

3. If the task seems overwhelming, just take a baby step. That, at least, will get you moving – so the next step’s easier.

4. Tell yourself that you can suffer for up to twenty minutes – and then you’ll return to doing things you want to do. You’ll be surprised to discover that “suffering’s” not that bad.

5. Decide to do the task as soon as you get up – as the more you put it off, the worse it’s going to seem!

6. Don’t pretend that other work counts just as much as what you’re leaving. Simply acting like you’re busy won’t make it go away. Be honest with yourself … and do what’s most important first.

“Sometimes “later” becomes “never”. Do it now.” – Unknown