Category: sadness

There are people who take the heart out of you, and there are people who put it back.

1. The same themes and patterns (which are usually self-defeating) keep reappearing, or repeating themselves.

2. Hurt, and unresolved issues and problems from your past, are stopping you from living and enjoying your life now. Also, these are triggered more frequently than previously.

3. You have trouble coping with powerful emotions – like overwhelming anger or excessive crying.

4. You feel anxious, restless and dissatisfied, and feel as if something needs to change in your life.

5. You feel dazed or shocked by something that has happened, and can’t pick up the pieces and just ‘be normal’ again.

6. You keep pushing down your feelings, and denying your emotions, but they keep resurfacing – and crying for attention.

7. You’re afraid of digging deeper … so you make a lot of changes that are surface, superficial – but don’t really set you free.

8. You can’t let go of something that meant a lot to you – a disappointment, or a failure, or a past relationship.

1. Find out the kind of depression they are suffering from. Symptoms of clinical depression include sleep difficulties, loss of appetite, a desire to isolate themselves, feelings of hopelessness and helplessness, suicidal tendencies and an inability to determine the cause of their depression. Those with situational depression may have some of the same symptoms but they generally know why they feel as they do, and once the issue is resolved, they are able to function normally again.

2. Be available to listen, or just be there for them. Sometimes you don’t need to say a word. Don’t offer opinions or advice; don’t judge them; be patient and understanding; be empathic, gentle and compassionate.

3. Take them out of their environment as a change of scenery can help to change our mood. It doesn’t have to be wildly exciting – just a walk by the river or a coffee at the mall is often enough to shift things a bit.

4. Don’t comment on their lifestyle (habits and patterns). Comments like “You ought to try and sleep more … or change your diet … or exercise more … are likely to shut the person down. These are often beyond the person’s control.

5. Encourage your friend to seek professional help. A friend or family member can be a real lifeline; but objective support from a professional counsellor can help them deal with the cause in a more effective way.

Forget the past and what lies behind you. This is your chance to begin again.

1. Realizing that you’ve lost them and can never have them back

2. Reliving the old memories and the fun times that you had

3. Pretending that you’re happy when you’re miserable and sad

4. Being obsessed with the wrong person who will never love you back

5. Regretting how you acted, or the careless things you said

6. Recognizing it’s your fault that things have turned out wrong

7. Being abandoned or rejected by your friends or family.

1. Decide to let go of worry and “what ifs”

2. Work on developing your self-confidence

3. Forgive yourself, and others, and let go of grievances

4. Be open and warm in your relationships

5. Don’t compare yourself with other people

6. Define own success

7. Be optimistic, and keep on persevering.

Time will pass; this will pass; and I will eventually be myself again.

Time doesn’t heal anything, it just teaches you how to live with the pain.

It’s hard to turn the page when you know someone won’t be in the next chapter,

I know it hurts right now but I promise you’ll be happy again.