Category: student

1. Go-getters are people who believe in themselves, and this causes others to believe in them as well.

2. Go-getters are determined and passionate. Their enthusiasm is attractive and contagious.

3. Go-getters are persistent despite the obstacles. Each time they are knocked down they get back up and try again.

4. Go-getters are inventive, creative and resourceful. They think outside the box and love to generate ideas.

5. Go-getters are proactive and like to confront problems. They see it as a challenge, and a way to get ahead.

6. Go-getters are adaptive, and are highly flexible. If one way doesn’t work then they will try a different way.

7. Go-getters are great dreamers who also set clear goals. They know where they are going and they`re focused on that goal.

1. Make a genuine commitment to being a disciplined person.

2. Be honest about your weaknesses, distractions, and any habits that might knock you off your course.

3. Make a realistic plan. Write it down, or share it with a friend who will help you to be accountable.

4. Design your day to avoid those temptations that will likely undermine your self discipline.

5. If necessary, change your routine.

6. Reward yourself for small steps in the right direction.

7. Although you are aiming to make change a habit, accept that there are likely to be times when you fail – and if you do, just move on as you can always start again.

1. Make the most of those little slots of time – a free fifteen minutes here and there. You can accomplish a lot in those extra lost minutes.

2. Make your work place comfortable and inviting. For example, have an inspiring bookshelf, light a scented candle, put up a few crazy, fun photographs.

3. Don’t be afraid of criticism as it can help you to learn and grow. Dreading it too much creates anxiety which thn prevents you from producing your best.

4. Recognise that we rarely feel happy when we’re working as we often struggle with incompetence, frustration and feeling that we don’t know what to do.

5. Remember all the reasons why it’s worth persevering, and how you’re going to feel when you finally get there.

1. Don’t worry about making new friends. There will be so many people and opportunities!!

2. There’s nothing wrong with feeling anxious and afraid. Everyone is new and will be feeling scared like you!

3. Don’t try to change yourself or act as if you’re someone different. You’re fine the way you are – so just be genuine and real.

4. It’s normal to feel lonely and to miss the life you had. It’s part of taking risks, and being brave, and moving on.

5. You’ll wonder if you’ll fit, or find a place in this new world. But that will start to change, and soon this new place will feel good.

6. Don’t only socialise, and go to everything you can. Make some space for being alone, and time for quiet solitude.

7. At the same time, make sure you force yourself to move outside your comfort zone, and try new things with others, and see what you enjoy.

1. Have a realistic plan for your day. Don’t just work on impulse, and don’t do try to do more than you can handle.

2. Prioritize your work, and do the most important things first.

3. Know what your distractions are, and take steps to control them (for example, switch off your phone).

4. Start early, and keep on going, even when you feel discouraged or fed up.

5. Know what’s irrelevant, and don’t waste your time on unproductive, or pointless things.

6. Switch between focused work and lots of short breaks.

7. Be flexible if you meet with obstacles, or things don’t turn out the way you’d planned.

1. Be honest with yourself and admit that you’re putting off stuff that really needs to be done.

2. Try and figure out why you’re procrastinating. Is it because you don’t like it, it creates anxiety, you don’t understand it, it feels overwhelming, you’re disorganised …?

3. Decide to break the habit of procrastination by deliberately rewarding yourself for doing something you’d rather not do.

4. Make a pact with a friend –where you deliberately and regularly encourage each other, and hold each other accountable.

5. Sit down and think – in detail – about all the likely consequences of not doing what needs to be done. Be brutally honest, and try and picture what you’re life is going to look like 6 months, a year and five years from now ( if you continue to procrastinate).

6. Decide to break large tasks down into smaller, more achievable tasks, and then tackle these smaller tasks one at a time.

7. Recognise your progress, and affirm and praise yourself for making these changes – and doing things differently, even though it’s hard.

1. Get into the habit of being an early riser. We can all benefit from having a little bit of extra time in the morning. It reduces stress, helps to prevent you from forgetting things, and stops that crazy morning rush.

2. Deliberately decide to tune out distractions. Turn off the TV, social media, your phone, and hide away when you need to get work done.

3. Prepare for the next day the night before. Check off your mental to-do list and prepare for the next day before you go to bed. If possible, choose your clothes, find your books, pack your bag, and so on.

4. Prioritise being organized. For example, it often helps to use an agenda to stay on track with assignments and homework.

5. Go to bed at a reasonable time. A good night’s sleep is one of the best tips for learning, remembering and doing well at school.

6. Make reading one of your hobbies. Research indicates that reading is one of the best ways for developing language skills and building a strong vocabulary.

7. Eat well. A protein breakfast and balanced meals help sustain your energy throughout the day, and is essential for building a healthy brain.

8. Get fresh air and exercise. This helps with mental alertness, concentration, an efficient memory and a positive mood.

Successful people are not gifted. They just work hard, then succeed on purpose.

1.Sort out your priorities. Make time to honestly reflect on your life, and to think about what is important to you. Where are you going? What do you want? What are the steps that will take you there?

2. Focus on the essential tasks. Next, think about your short term responsibilities. Ask yourself: “Out of all the tasks that I have to do, which will get me the greatest return for my time and effort?” Make a list of these types of tasks — they’re your most important things to do this week.

3. Eliminate what you can. Now look at your list. What on the list is not essential? Is there anything there that you can drop from your schedule, delegate to someone else, or put on a “waiting list”. Often when we review these non-essentials later, we find they weren’t necessary at all.

4. Do essential tasks first. Begin each day by doing the two most important tasks. Don’t wait until later in the day as they’ll get pushed aside to make time for other stuff that arises throughout the day. You’ll find that if you do these tasks right away, your productivity will really increase.

5. Eliminate distractions. If you allow yourself to be constantly interrupted by email notifications, IM, cell phones, social media and so on, then you’ll never be productive. Turn them and, if you can, disconnect yourself from the internet.

6. Keep it simple. Don’t waste time on applications that are meant to organise your schedule. Make a simple to-do list with a word document, or with some paper and a pen. Then get started on whatever work you had planned on doing.

7. Do one thing at a time. In most situations, multi-tasking slows you down. You can’t get things done with a million things demanding your attention. Focus on what’s in front of you, to the exclusion of all else. That way, you are likely to achieve more, in less time, and with less effort.

1. Start early. Don’t leave studying to the last minute as cramming doesn’t really work. Preparing well in advance leaves you with time to ask questions and review topics you don’t fully understand.

2. Plan and organise your study time. Decide what you will do, in what order, and by what date.

3. Have an area that you designate specifically for studying. Don’t do anything else there. Keep all your notes, textbooks, materials etc in that area.

4. Study something each day – but allow yourself one whole day off a week. That way, you stay on top of your work without feeling bogged down and overwhelmed.

5. Make your own notes; rewrite material you’ve studied using your own words. Doing that, will help to consolidate your learning.

6. Cover up material you’re studying and try to summarise it, or to paraphrase it.

7. Don’t review material you know already. Assign your time to work that you still find challenging.